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Does anyone have a childminder with working full time as a single adopter?


Thanks, nessa76


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My AD was already school age when she arrived. She wasn't able to cope with a child minder/ after school club for the first couple of years and I had to employ a nanny to pick up and look after her at home. I didn't work full time once AD arrived, but reduced my hours so that I had a day off on Fridays and a shorter day on Mondays so that I could pick her up. I really, really needed that day to myself on Fridays (still do) - to relax, do a bit of gardening and the mountains of paperwork associated with a child with complex needs. As a single working parent (now working 4 full days a week), I don't sit down in the evenings until about 9pm and by which time I'm utterly exhausted...


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I'm self employed and I haven't tried to work full time since our kids joined us, six years ago, although I have had busy periods. My boy wouldn't tolerate a childminder, he needs it to be me or dad - which can be a bit of a pain! All childcare is done by Nana and grandad, or by one aunt & uncle, neither of whom live near us. We've never been able to push beyond that. I've been asked to do a uni lecturing job once a week for 15 weeks that I would really like to do, but finding childcare just for that will be a complete nightmare!


I agree about there exhaustion. I've been reducing my hours, but I could always just sleep at teatime!


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Im not sure how much of your question is about working full time or having a childminder to enable you to do so.


so, my son was also school age and has always loved after school clubs but they were not always available at his primary school. I have always worked part time, for similar reasons as CLR. I just need time to myself and to do stuff that needs doing without a child hanging off my neck. Even now he is in secondary and I can leave him for a few hours to go shopping or whatever, the time alone is still what keeps me sane


Whatever scenario you ask about there will aleays be an adopter for whom those arrangements work. So I would think about


what your child can cope with, including how long they are going to be out of the house

your commuting time

think about what your weekends will look like if you work full time - one of the reasons I work part time is so I can clear the decks for weekend so I dont have to drag a reluctant child after me while I do essential things


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I'm not single and my DH works at home so is around during the day for child-related events when needed. I still only work 4 full days though and refuse to contemplate giving up my day off in the week. Having children is full on - even when they get older, like mine are, there's still homework to supervise, events and activities to ferry them to, various appointments and time required to referee squabbles. My day off is the only day I can (mostly) be alone, catch up and do my own thing.


Re childcare - one of ours is quite challenging and it was hard to find childcare providers who would accept her behaviours when young, the other was fine with a lovely couple who childminded. We were lucky that they went to a primary school with a lovely after school club staffed by people who knew their idiosyncrasies as they worked within the school too. There were issues when they were in infants but as they got older they were very happy to go to the club. (The same people ran a breakfast club which we could use if DH had an early meeting or was away on business). We are also fortunate to have family members close by who we can call on if need be.


What I'm saying is childcare might work out for a particular child but you can't rely that it will or that there won't be other related issues so it helps to have other possibilities to fall back on in emergencies.


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Regarding the childminder - it would need to be a very special person (they do exist) so I would spend a lot of time looking into the WHO not just the whether it could work. Other than that I second what others have said - I have only worked part time since our children came (now nearly 20 years ago) although I worked full time for many years with birth children in a very responsible job requiring a great deal of commitment and extra hours too. I work for my husband now so have the added benefit of flexibility - I work 10-3 and that is enough for me (sadly). At the moment I have to leave one day a week to take my daughter to therapy there's a journey she couldn't cope with and also they require someone to be present in case of emergencies) and another day she has been having sessions with the local MH team - so even working those restricted hours is difficult. For 5 years I had to take and collect her form school in another area as she was at a special school but didn't get transport. But as someone else said that doesn't mean that there aren't situations where it is possible and other ways to make things work for you


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Thanks everyone. The reason I was asking is regarding pick up from school, to make it convenient with working full time. However, part time work maybe okay, if I get support financially with Housing Benefit (Rent).


I am applying for a private landlord property with a 2 bedroom flat/house who accepts DSS, relying on my local council is useless, I'm not classed as a priority on waiting lists and it could take years before getting a property from them!!!


nessa76


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Check out the local housing benefit rates for private lets - most have a maximum rent they will subsidise (and its generally pretty low rather than market rate) - the threshold for qualifying for housing benefit is pretty low and in my experience any work is likely to take you over the threshold. Somewhere like your local CAB should be able to help with benefit checks - you will get child benefit and may also qualify for child Tax Credit or even Working Tax Credit.


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Best of luck Nessa. You seem to be considering everything! x


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Thanks Haven, I have and am considering everything. One step at a time is best for me to avoid any delays in the adoption process.


I am applying for voluntary work, where I can do multi things and one of them will definitely be working with children obviously. That way I will also be able to get the 3 references that are needed to adopt but I only need 2 of them for voluntary work which I've already got.


nessa76


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Forgot something, I may be eligible for full/partial housing benefit depending on my annual salary from working. I never knew but that will save me money, where part time should be okay. Rent can be so expensive nowadays.


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