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Question around medical

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Hello,


My husband and I are applying to adopt after Christmas. We are currently waiting for the 6 months after fertility tests have ended (this seems to be dragging!) and are using the time to read alot around adoption, we have decorated house and are getting our finances in order. My question is around the medical, my BMI is currently 32- I have started working on getting this down, with the intention to have a couple of stone by the time we see the social workers. Can anyone tell me the extent to which they will look at this? I am keeping the 'weigh in' details to show that I am working on it (I have PCOS so loosing weight is difficult!). Can anyone advise me if the social workers will be happy if we can show that I am loosing weight/ adopting lifestyle changes, or if they will expect a perfect BMI score?


Thanks!


Helen


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Hiya. My BMI is over 38 and it was hardly mentioned!

So long as your weight is managed and you are able to live comfortably attending work and no other heath issues. And generally 'fit' it was fine. We have a beautiful daughter now.


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Some SWs get very wound up about it. My BMI was 32 and I was sent for hospital tests. Others barely mention it.


You would be very unlucky to get an SW who insisted on a perfect BMI, most will be happy that you can demonstrate you are aware and are doing something about it.


If you were in the morbidly obese category, you might find it difficult. As it is I'm sure you will be fine


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"Some SWs get very wound up about it. Others barely mention it."


Yeah, speaking to other adopters it does seem to be very inconsistent. No idea what my BMI is, but I would guess it's over 30. It was never mentioned.


I did put some stuff in the PAR about how we eat healthily and exercise. Perhaps be preemptive. Wouldn't do any harm to try to loose a bit of weight of show some evidence of a healthy lifestyle.


As PPs say, if generally fit, shouldn't be a big deal.


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I was considered morbidly obese and lost weight and made changes. It was seen as a positive and was barely mentioned at all. I put some weight back on between our first and second placements and again showed I could pull it back. It wasn't a issue for them as I had made positive changes.


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Basically they want someone who will promote healthy eating habits to their adoptive child and be able to parent them till adulthood.


They are less likely to be as concerned about weight if you are in you early 30s or younger, being obese increases your chances of developing heart disease, stroke, diabetes etc earier than someone of healthy weight.


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I don't know my BMI but I am overweight - the only time this has been mentioned and we are just about to start stage 2 was when the Dr hadn't written my height on the form so had I been my weight and 5' then there would have been a problem - I am tall and broad! I would say in other terms of fitness I do exercise and eat well and therefore this has not been an issue (so far).


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My BMI was 37 when I had the medical (was lower by panel and matching) and I was v surprised that it was never mentioned. I did invest a lot of time during the approval process in trying to get fit and that was all written in my PAR.


I kind of made it a positive project to get ready for parenthood rather than focussing on diet, so I had swimming lessons (as I had never mastered front crawl), ice skating lessons (romantic notions of ice rinks at Christmas) and got on a bike for the first time since being a teenager.


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My wife has been sent to two medicals and is still being criticised by a "medical" advisor who looks over the GP medical. My wife does have a BMI a bit higher than 30 however she works with children with additional needs, runs about with a child in a wheelchair, does regular exercise however she has PCOS so weight loss has never been easy for her. It has really knocked her confidence.


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My BMI was 39 at point of medical and I’d lost 4 stone by that point. So still morbidly obese. I got in there early in the assessment to mention it. I think it’s good to show that you understand why they are concerned about people who are overweight/ long term health implications etc. But it wasn’t a deal breaker for me. Infact was barely mentioned x


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When we initially started in stage I our SW made it sound like I had to get to BMI 30 before we could continue (I am/was high end 30's). I completely flipped out and was not happy. it was never mentioned in their initial visit. We had our GP medical and I have no other contra-indications and healthy otherwise and she had no issue recommending us to adopt. Our Stage 2 SW has said it will probably be brought up in panel, but I just need to "prove" that I am trying to lose weight. That said, we have joined bootcamp twice a week, I do Zumba twice a week and also on Cambridge Weight Plan (have a bridesmaid dress to get into in Jan) - I am shattered! She also said, when parents with their adopted children attend their social events, the weight has gone back on because everyone is happy, relaxed and comfortable! If there are no other health issues It shouldn't be a major thing, unless you are eating chocolate and takeaway every night (we are not!).


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