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Info needed on the changes from the children's act may 2007

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Just had an email about this from our la asking to complete a survey - apparently la must give more help and info to adoptive parents on education - it's very vague and I wonder if anyone knew what this involves in practice - could do with info/help on transitions as our two ad are moving class in sept after two years with same teacher - they are very settled but do not deal with change at all well. Had no real info from school on how to go about supporting them - they are currently in year one and two - anyone know who to contact or anyone have any tips please. Also have a very reluctant reader (youngest) - older one fine but youngest shows no real interest and battles it - very little progress made - has one to one reading at school but not really helping that much. She just hates it. She is going into a harder class next year and I want to help her so she doesn't end up struggling and disliking learning. I think she may be dyslexic - anyone know what age they can test? I of course am not expecting her to be academically gifted I just want her to be happy. Thanks for listening as always without these boards I would be swimming in the dark. A lifeline at times.


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Not sure about children's act but we have experience of a dyslexia diagnosis. Our dd was as you describe from a very young age, no interest in books, stories, learning the alphabet. She was running and hiding during phonic sessions and since Reception has had a very negative view of reading. We said to everyone that she was dyslexic but no-one was interested. Eventually we took her to a private Ed Psych when she was 8. It cost £500 but we got a very detailed report showing that she is severely dyslexic and the report actually states that her education up until then would have been 'extremely distressing' due to the level of her difficulties. She goes to a special school who also missed her dyslexia because everything was but down to trauma. There is a general lack of willingness to test for and diagnose dyslexia in this country. The best thing for our daughter has been tutoring at an explore learning centre. We've also found the books toe by toe and stareway to spelling very helpful.


A xx


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I am a dyslexia specialist and an ed psych will generally diagnose from year 2, although some will want to leave it till towards the end of year 2. An early diagnosis or strong indicators of it being present allowing for correct intervention to be put in place does increase the chance that a person will learn to overcome or bypass some of the difficulties caused by dyslexia.


As angelgirl said it can be hard to get an assessment through the school. Schools have limited access to Ed. psychs and have to prioritise the children they have needing a referral for a variety of needs. A private assessment will get you further faster. Depending on where you live and what your LA offer you should be able to access the service/support offered by your local authority with an independent assessment.


For information on getting an independent assessment in your local area you can contact the British Dyslexia Association. They also keep a register of approved specialist teachers in your area who give 1-1 specialist multisensory tutoring (reccomended for people with dyslexia). This of course would be a private arrangement.


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Thanks baker girl is the assessment something you can claim through the adoption support fund


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I am not sure. I am in Northern Ireland and we don't have adoption support fund here. Sorry! Hopefully others will know the answer to that!


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I don't think you can - but no harm in asking! There is a list of specifics on their website


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We had a private EP assessment too - local authority EP not exactly my best friend! Private EP says my daughter is hyperlexic - which I'd not come across before!


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Also regarding reading - my son had problems with reading - but is not dyslexic - he has language comprehension levels in the lowest 1% which obviously affects reading too - school did not pick this up - but CAMHS did cognitive assessments when he was 15 (school would not pay for these) and found this amongst other things. My daughter is dyslexic - first primary school did not pick this up but when she went to an inclusion centre in another primary school following EP assessments and statementing she used Toe by Toe there (mentioned above) - following this she learned to read whereas she had made no progress in her first school and they just kept doing the same thing over and over and did not change their approach. I think the ASF can pay for multi-disciplinary assessments - so try to keep it general (which is best anyway) if you take this route - but I think you have to have tried through school / normal route first (at least in my area)


Otherwise private of course is much the simplest and quickest if you can afford it - so worth doing some research on this - but again I would keep it as general as possible unless you are very sure what you are seeing


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Update - spoke to pad and really helpful virtual head is calling me tomorrow and have a meeting with school Friday apparently if it is then the Davis technique is really good and it may be funded if if helps with emotional outbursts as well - thank you for all the info really helpful - will let you know how I get on. Asked my daughter earlier what she likes about reading answer nothing! We can only go up.


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Hi, Becky here from Adoption UK. Just a comment on the Children and Social Work Act 2017 - the Act makes it mandatory for each LA to appoint a person or people to support the education of children who are adopted/SGO/CAO from care throughout schools in the LA. It is currently widely assumed that this role will fall to existing Virtual Schools. The details of what this support ought to be have not yet been made clear. The Act also makes it mandatory for each school to have a designated member of staff responsible for the educational welfare of children who are adopted/SGO/CAO from care in the same way as they already have a designated staff member for looked after children. Some Virtual Schools are already assuming this role to varying degrees, but others are holding off until further guidance is issued. Hope that helps!


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Our son is a reluctant reader. We have been asking SENCO to do cognitive tests. We were told they would not be doing these but they have a book of tests to see if he is Dyslexic. He is working through these so do not know the outcome. He is 9. I can sympathise with the reading. I searched for dyslexic friendly books from the library on subjects that he is interested in, but we have not managed to complete any of them even with me reading to him. However we found an USBORNE factual book for early readers on a topic they were doing at school, in a pound shop and he took it to his room and later told us facts he had read.


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My son didn't read until he was 9. Until that time his behaviour got in the way of learning. Then he was diagnosed ASD to go along with his ADHD. We focused on trying to find books that matched his interests - factual books rather than fiction - science, planets, Guinness book of world records, Minecraft. Then we moved on to Beano - comics and annuals. Eventually we discovered David Williams, Cressida Cowell and Alex Ryder books. Anything other than the mainly god awful books that they come home from school with.


At 13, he's not an avid reader of fiction but still loves his factual books!


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My AD (year 7) has always struggled with reading. Diagnosed when in year 4 with non-verbal communication disorder, which basically means that while she can read the words, she can't process and hold the meaning to comprehend the text. I'm happy with the diagnosis as it helped get LA support for a specialist school, but suspect that developmental trauma (or even FAS) is the underlying issue. We continue to struggle on with the reading, but it is still really difficult. However, audio books really work for her. I resisted these for years as thought this would reduce her incentive to continue trying. Not a sensible approach in retrospective. Unabridged audio books let her access new ideas, vocabulary and stimulate her imagination. She loves playing lego (less so now) or colouring while she listens - and really relaxes which is lovely to see. As AD has a diagnosed learning difficulty, I was able to join the wonderful Listening Books charity which lets you 'borrow' online a fantastic range of audio books.


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With regards to the children's act - are the children meant to have this support as of now? Just wondering as dd school have not mentioned a single thing about this to me. The only reason I know about it is because of the news feature on adoption UK.


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Hi Safia. Just wanted to ask you about reading. My daughter is in year 7 and is doing OK in English except for reading. She scored precisely zero in the reading paper for end of year 7 exams and the teacher is stunned. I am asking (with some resistance) for support in this area as it has been a difficulty all year but only now are school starting to pick up on it. Do you know if there is a specific assessment I can ask for? Thanks


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Hi, our local authority will not assess for dyslexia but now say to parents to pay & get assessments privately. I think that's pretty awful but you can go through charities to ask for some help. Unfortunately part of the horrible cuts from government


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Hi Pokemon - the Children and Social Work Act creates the legal basis for the provision, but as I understand it we are awaiting further guidance. Most of the people I was speaking to in virtual schools were expecting to take on this role from the start of the next new school year, but that was before the general election. I suspect schools will also need further guidance on this to support them in interpreting the Act, which simply says this designated staff member provision has to be there, but little else. However, there's nothing to stop you asking your school if they know about it, and what their plans might be!


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Thank you for your help Schools Smile will have a chat with the schoolx


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