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Hair/Skin care questions

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Help please please please


My DW and I go to approval panel next week and we already have a potential match which our sw is keen to get the ball rolling on once we've been approved (she seems to think we will pass panel without a problem although we're nervous as hell obviously)


The lo we have shown an interest in is mixed race her dad was mixed race white british/Afro-Caribbean and mum was white British and we have been told by our s/w that there could potentially be issues with her hair and skin changing as she gets older and obviously we have no problem with this but equally being a white British couple we don't know anything about skin care for a lo like this and are wondering if anyone can help with any advice for skin/hair care for a mixed race lo who is under 8. It has been stressed to us that we would need to be able to do things for her rather than sending her off to have things done.

As an example our sw (who is mixed race herself) has said "at the moment her hair is fairly straight brown hair but could become more "afro" as she gets older so if she decides she wants corn-rows you have to know how to do them for her, also her skin could darken and she will need different skin care to you" But she didn't really elaborate any more so kind of left us dangling a bit and thinking we're at a bit of a loss now. Any advice/hints/tips would be gratefully received thank you :-)


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I wouldn't worry too much. My son is dual heritage and it is a bit easier for boys as he just gets a number two! Black skins can be prone to dryness so he has a moisturiser all over after a bath. I dont use any thing special, just Nivea or astral . His hair was a bit more difficult, he has Afro hair, and it was very dry when he came home. After trial and error with a few products we have settled on washing , with the tiniest amount of shampoo, which can be very drying for black hair, followed by an intense conditioner , the Aussie range, and we finish off with an olive oil from the Bodyshop. It can be a more difficult with girls if they like their hair long. It can take more looking after and shampooing getting it wet can cause problems with drying the hair, but there are lots of products readily available for black hair. If you google black skin and hair care you'll find plenty of sites for products and advice. In the event that she suddenly decides she wants cornrows I'd just say that you will take her to a black hairdresser and learn how to do it.


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Serrakunda thank you so much for the speedy reply that is really really helpful and useful information. thank you :-)


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Catfamily, I agree. Lots of people I know get hairdressers or barbers to braid their hair or their childrens'. Usually the trick is finding a hairdresser who is used to dual heritage hair which can be less curly. My challenge is going to be the reaction of my mother in law. She burst into tears when my husband braided his hair when younger!


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Thank you Barbados Girl that has put my mind at rest somewhat, the sw that told us we would have to learn how to do this is actually our sw boss who came to see us a couple of weeks ago in what was supposed to be the "midway" review (we go to panel next week so much for midway lol) But I've overheard some of the girls at work talking about cornrows/braiding and they all seem to go to a hairdressers, I think I was just a bit confused by what our sw boss told us. Thanks again :-)


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Though this girl is three quarters white, she's unlikely to suddenly sprout an Afro if she doesn't have that hair type now. Yes when she hits puberty things might change , my hair and skin became like grease buckets overnight ! But then it's a question of finding the right products. If you look in the archive here you should find threads about this.


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My cousin is 16 and mixed race, half black, half white and has very loose curls to this day so as Serrakunda says it's unlikely that this child is suddenly going to sprout an Afro. On the other hand, despite not being of dual-heritage (not counting going back a number of generations), my skin has darkened as I aged and my hair did become noticeably more 'afro'.


Despite this, even with the rest of my family without the dual-heritage , our hair types and skin tones vary greatly. I could line us up from lightest brown to darkest brown. It will be about getting to know your child's hair and skin and experimenting to find what works. For instance, whilst I have afro hair, my curls are looser than those of my younger brother and tighter than those of my younger sister. Even on the same head of hair I have very tight afro curls at the back and looser curls on the top. My hair will hold cornrows easier than my sisters or my cousins, but my brother's is much more suited to it. I think the only generic advice I could give is the tighter the curl, the drier the hair and conventional cleaning products often strip the hair and skin of its natural oils. Find a product and a regime that works for your child and stick with it, whether that be co-washing (conditioner only), using all natural products and making them yourself at home, cornrowing, protective styling (keeping hair off the shoulders and clothes) or cutting it short like me!


Good luck.


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Starryeyed thank you so much this is all really helpful advice so thank you so much i cannot begin to tell you how much i appreciate all the help we are getting on here :-)


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Catfamily, if you need any help, feel free to message me. Hair and skincare was something I was really interested in when I was learning to take care of my own hair and grow it without putting a relaxer in it which just damaged my hair. I've been through just about every style possible so if you need any advice I'm happy to help


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Our daughter is of mixed origin , we are very luck in that the area we live is very multi cultural and we have a lot of shops that sell hair and skin products for every one, I actually asked a customer in the shop when I was in there what she used, and even though I am white I have very curly hair and have been using the products myself as well and have never had my hair in such good condition!!!


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Hi there cat family - we are a white couple with two sons, one dual heritage one black african. My oldest son has long afro hair and I cane row it myself, no probs - taught myself on you tube;) we've had a Sunday morning movie and braiding ritual since he turned two. A year and a half in and I've got friends and family asking me to do their boys hair! Number two son just a baby but I'm sure we will end up watching cars and braiding with big bro. We wash their hair no more than once a week, conditioner only, and use Shea butter based hair food. We use waitrose baby bottom butter (which is just lovely smelling olive oil base cream) on their skins.


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