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Children and the negative associations with skin colour

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Some youtube footage which is similar to tests done on Child of Our Time on BBC by Robert Winston probably 10 years ago. A helpful, if very sad, way to see that very young children have formed ideas from the world around them on skin colour and its positive and negative connotations.

See link in comments cos it won't be clickable here


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http://youtu.be/tkpUyB2xgTM


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BUMPING


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I really dislike this 'doll test' it's a sad set up by adults : These are such leading and idiotic questions!!!! This is just making the child have to choose from supposed opposites, that they should not have to choose from. Why would an adult ask 'which is the nice doll?' why would an adult ask 'Which is the bad doll?' you are setting the child up. These adults are leading children to black and white thinking. There should not even be a forum for children to say which is the 'bad child' the 'ugly child' they just need to have it explained that ALL children are equally beautiful and unique and good and ALL children might some times do things that are not acceptable (because they are just learning how to be)- but they aren't bad or ugly or dumb!!!


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Wouldn't a utopia be wonderful, where colour of skin, visual disfigurements, physical disability and general quirkiness were regarded as uniquely beatiful and special. Sadly this utopia doesn't exist. Children LEARN colour (and other prejudices) before they start nursery school, even two year old are not colour blind. Child of our time back in 2004/5 did this test with photos of children, four at a time if I recall correctly, not dolls, they had the same sad result, the white child was most often picked as the desirable playmate/nicest/cleverest etc. in my experience by age 6/7 most children are quite discerning about playmates, there will be kids that they played with at 5 who now they consider not worthy of playing with. You'd be amazed how much parents influence this thinking, subtly or not so subtly directing their kids towards desirable playmates. It can be as simple as the mums own social circle of other mums significantly influencing who their kids play with. If you haven't encountered this yet then wait till you people watch over 26 years of parenthood in a middle class, fairly affluent area as I have. It's very interesting, but very sad for some of the kids who are marginalised by peers while they are still quite young.

Children under 9 or 10 mostly function on thinking that bases that there are definitive answers to questions, yes or no, can or can't, possible or impossible. The 'shades of grey' thinking develops in adolescence, when young people recognise that things are rarely clear cut, different circumstances, situations all play a role and mean that there are a multitude of possible answers to a single question.

Going back to colour and race, these issues are pervasive and endemic and really hard to shift, you can only impact your own kids usually. In Child of our Time the wee black boy featured was doing incredibly well at four/five with his own positive self perception, but his parents worked at ensuring he grew up with a good perception of black role models and of his own value in the family and his own society.


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Second paragraph

http://www3.open.ac.uk/events/7/2005112_38827_o1.doc

I've looked before for the video footage but they took the COOT web pages down years ago.


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